Swedish Word Removed After Pressure From Google

The Swedish authorities have been forced to discard the word ‘ungooglebar’ from a language list following a series of complaints by the leading search engine. The word, which literally translates as ‘ungooglable’, refers to subjects and types of content which aren’t listed in the search engines. The types of anonymous websites created by extreme political groups are a prime example.

Google objected to the inclusion of this word, as it referred to search engines in general. They sent a number of emails stating their dissatisfaction and outlining the actions which would be taken if the word remained in the list. The Head of the Swedish Language Council said, ‘We’re removing the word today and stating our displeasure with Google’s attempt to control the language.’

Google Launch A Mobile Advertising Tool

Marketers who are keen to gauge the success of their mobile advertisements may well be interested in a new tool developed by Google. The utility which is available at howtogomo.com enables advertisers to see whether they are achieving a good number of online conversions. It also provides data regarding mobile downloads and calls made by people who clicked on the mobile advertisements.

A leading technological analyst said, ‘It’s really designed to help professional marketers and agencies understand how to calculate mobile ROI and think more broadly and creatively about the impact of mobile on conversions in a new, multi-screen consumer environment.’

Google Warn News Websites About Paid Content

You might well remember the Google penalisation which Interflora incurred after paying for the inclusion of advertorials on leading news websites. The leading search engine has recently reinforced their stance by saying ‘If a site mixes news content with affiliate, promotional, advertorial, or marketing materials(for your company or another party), we strongly recommend that you separate non-news content on a different host or directory, block it from being crawled with robots.txt’

Websites that do not heed this warning are running the risk of being completely removed from the Google News Index. So site owners thinking of cashing in on their news presence are best advised to ensure that paid links have the no-follow attribution from now on.

What Do You Think?

Did Google overreact to the inclusion of the branded word in the Swedish language? Would you pay for advertorials featuring no-follow links? We Welcome And Will Respond To Any Comments You Wish To Make At The Bottom Of This Post, Also Please Feel Free To Tweet And Google+ This Content!